Innovative Leadership Programme co-hosted by ICON

South Africa needs leadership that is ethical, committed and effective.  The death of Nelson Mandela has reminded us of our need for leadership that will not just steer us ahead, but do so in a way that maintains the hope of a fully democratic, nonviolence and just society.  ICON’s response has been to join with Durban University of Technology (DUT) and ACCORD (the African Centre for the Constructive Resolution of Disputes) to launch the Innovative Leadership Programme.

Participants and staff working in groups

Participants and staff working in groups

The initial workshop on 22nd February brought together 30 DUT students from a very diverse range of discipline areas.  Part of the potential of the Programme is to unlock the resources that students bring to the course.

Listening carefully to each other across differences

Listening carefully to each other across differences

 

A compelling session was when four students spoke about projects in which they have taken leadership.  Here Walter Nsengiyumva speaks of walking 3 300 kms from Rwanda to Congo Brazzaville as an 11 year old, and of how he then developed a training facility in the refugee camp.

Panel of four students with Crispin Hemson, ICON Director

Panel of four students with Crispin Hemson, ICON Director

 

ICON’s interest in this project is partly to develop new ways of working with young people who came into tertiary education with a wealth of experience that is often not tapped as a resource.  It is partly also to develop the thinking of young people around the meaning of nonviolence in the new context of Africa today.  Part of the wealth of the course is brought by the presence of DUT students from elsewhere in Africa.

ICON was represented by the director, Crispin Hemson, and by its deputy chairperson, Paddy Kearney, who spoke on the life of Denis Hurley, the archbishop who was central to the opposition to apartheid.

Paddy Kearney, deputy chairperson of ICON, speaking on leadership lessons from the life of Archbishop Hurley, who was brought up on Robben Island

Paddy Kearney, deputy chairperson of ICON, speaking on leadership lessons from the life of Archbishop Hurley, who was brought up on Robben Island

 

ICON works at 3rd African Alliance for Peace Summit

Crispin Hemson participated in the training of activists from across the continent in Kigali, Rwanda, early in February 2014.  A large group worked together, sharing their experiences and challenges in bringing peace.  The key focus was on peace education.  ICON’s responsibility was to work on the theories and concepts of peace, and also to direct thinking on how we challenge violence within education.

Tackling concepts of peace

Tackling concepts of peace

 

Delegates at the Summit

Delegates at the Summit

 

“One of the realisations I had was the extent to which our history still constrains us – the trauma of unresolved conflicts, and how this can fuel new targets of aggression.” aggressive conflict”

What is the link between nonviolence and urban ecology?

 


Wildlife belongs in the city 
by Crispin Hemson Hemson is the director of the International Centre for Nonviolence, based at the Durban University of Technology, and is also with the Wildlife and Environmental Society of South Africa.
The Mercury
24 Feb 2014

EARLY this month there was a noise out on the patio late in the night, and I peered out. A dark shape moved across, smoothly. I reached for my camera and quietly opened the door. It stopped to rest and when I took the photo, it was not too disturbed by… read more…